30 ADH / Articles of Human Rights
María Siebald

30 ADH consists of 30 corporal micro-pieces on the 30 articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Each article is adapted to Spanish Sign Language (SSL) and interpreted in signs and movement by deaf performers.

Description

Each article is represented in one sentence with signs and movements, a choreographic phrase, a single movement or just signs. The 30 corporal micro-pieces will be part of an audiovisual piece.

30 ADH emerges as a new line based on Trasunto #2 and its meaning “to take from someone else", this time with universal information on the Declaration of Human Rights under a new visual-spatial linguistic format.

For María, the importance of the preparation of this material arises from the constant lack of information for the Deaf community in their own mother tongue, SSL. “There are certain spaces in which Human Rights have been brought to SSL in an informative format. But with 30 AHR we are building these basic rights hand in hand with corporal poetry” the artist explains.

“When we see a text transposed to an attractive visual format performed by dancers, as spectators we are able to understand and remember it better because not only are we receiving hard data, but each movement also activates sensations and connections and is transformed into a sensitive visual experience lodged in our memory. And that is where Human Rights must be installed, the basic principles of human relations, respect and justice, to recognise them and to remember them always.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights that was adopted and proclaimed in 1948, seeks dignity, protection, equality, justice for men and women as fundamental rights of humanity. It is one of the few agreements to have been achieved universally. 70 years later, we continue to see horrors and misery due to breaches of these rights by governments in different countries in the world”, reflects María Siebald.

MARIA SIEBALD                     

María Siebald, actor and director of the performance art working group Nerven&Zellen, leapt to worldwide fame with her music video of Scissor Sister’s version of Pink Floyd’s Comfortably NumbThis Chilean artist has been investigating sign language from 2009 and she incorporates it into her scenic language, creating projects designed for the Deaf community. Her objective is to bring the Deaf community closer to musical culture, the performing arts and poetry, opening up spaces for dialogue between the Deaf and Hearing cultures. “Every listener has a soundtrack in their memory”, Siebald explains. “We want to make it easier for Deaf people to build a visual memory, to identify with authors’ messages and to gain access to a piece intended for them”, she goes on. Of note among her projects are the digital platforms NZcanal, NZcanal for children, for which she creates and publishes music videos adapted to sign language, interpreting greatest hits by Scissor Sisters, Amy Winehouse or Luz Casal, among others. This innovative proposal has attracted the attention of international press and earned critical praise. In 2015, María Siebald obtained the AVONNI National Award for Innovation in Culture and in 2016 she received recognition for her contribution to culture, art and the social inclusion of people with disabilities - SENADIS.

Credits

Direction: María Siebald
ILSE adaptation: Lucile Preat
Audiovisual register: Antonio Perales
Performers: Román Palamariuk, Christian Gordo, Ángela Ibañez, Marcos Pereira, María José López and Aleluya Peña
Language: Spanish Sign Language (SSL) with Spanish subtitles

WORL PREMIÉRE

Finished
Date
5 - 21 April
Timetable

Friday 5 and 12: 5 to 8pm

Saturday, Sunday and holiday (Holy Thursday and Friday included): 12am a 8pm

Price

Free entrance